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Could permanent magnets stick to stainless steel surfaces?

Time:2024-4-19 Edit:WZ Magnetics

Is all stainless steel magnetic?

Most people are unsure, in a real sense, the answer is neither a yes nor a no. Some stainless steel varieties are magnetic while others are non-magnetic metals. Here let WZ Magnetics explain why.

In general, Stainless steel is an alloy composed mainly of iron, with chromium added to prevent rust or corrosion. The presence of iron in stainless steel does make it somewhat magnetic, but the specific composition and processing of the stainless steel determine its magnetic properties.

Austenitic stainless steels, like AISI304, AISI316, which are the most common type, are generally non-magnetic. However, steel AISI304 may become slightly magnetic after cold working or welding.

Ferritic (430)and martensitic stainless steels(416), on the other hand, are generally magnetic due to their crystal structure.

So, while it’s true that some varieties of stainless steel are magnetic and others are not, it’s essential to consider the specific type and composition of the stainless steel in question to determine its magnetic properties accurately.

What kind of stainless steel surfaces will Magnets stick to?

Only magnetic stainless steel surface that magnet can stick to, if you are not sure about the stainless steel type, please try it with a magnet.

Austenitic stainless steelFerritic stainless steelMartensitic stainless steel
Sometimes magneticMagneticMagnetic

It takes time to search the magnetic data on various stainless steel plate. We choose the common four types (430, 304, 316, & 430) for your reference. If you are not sure the steel type, please try to test with a magnet to check whether it’s magnetic or not.
430 Ferritic Stainless Steel: Magnetic
304 Austenitic Stainless Steel: Not magnetic, or a little magnetic after cold process (bending, deforming, etc.)
316 Austenitic Stainless Steel: Not magnetic.
416 Martensitic stainless steels: Magnetic
Will stainless steel act as a magnetic shield?
Steel can act as a magnetic shield, however, probably not in the way you are thinking. Magnetic “shields” don’t block magnetic fields, they redirect it.

Here we simulate the magnetic curves changing via stainless steel 430, 304, 316, and 416 closing to the same rod pot magnet. You will see how different stainless steel affects the magnet direction of a pure magnet.

Could permanent magnets stick to stainless steel surfaces?
304 Austenitic Stainless Steel has No Magnetic
Could permanent magnets stick to stainless steel surfaces?
416 Martensitic Stainless Steel has Magnetic
Could permanent magnets stick to stainless steel surfaces?
316 Austenitic Stainless Steel has No Magnetic
Could permanent magnets stick to stainless steel surfaces?
430 Ferritic Stainless Steel has Magnetic

How the magnetic steel plate affect the force of magnetic assembly?

For magnetic assembly, we normally suggest customers use magnetic steel plate that can change the magnetic curve direction, to increase the magnetic force on the holding side to fully use the magnetic fields.

A simple illustration below shows that by using a steel pot to encase a piece of disc magnet we can get even higher magnetic field strength around the edge area. In practical use for holding applications, based on this principle, compared with using a piece of raw magnet we can get higher force than using the pure raw magnet.

Could permanent magnets stick to stainless steel surfaces?

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